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Contemporary International Politics 2017/2018

  • 6 ECTS
  • Taught in Portuguese
  • Final Assessment

Objectives

By the end of the semester, students must be able to

1. Identify elements of structural change of the international system and of the most important public and academic debates they enable;

2. Distinguish different political, social, economic and military realities;

3. Describe the historical and political evolution of the international system.

Recommended Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of the international system

Teaching Metodology

As this course classes are theoretical-practical, they will be simultaneously have the presentation of the course contents by the professor (using the expository method) and debates by the students, based on recommended bibliographical resources or other to be defined in the class.

Body of Work

1. The New World Order

2. From the End of History to the Clash of Civilizations

3. Nuclear power

4. New actors and new threats

5. From the Washington Consensus to the post-Washington Consensus

6. PIGS, BRICs and other hierarchies

7. Justice and law in times of globalization

8. From just war to justified war?

9. Humanitarianism and interventionism: dangerous liaisons?

10. The Arab Springs

11. The New Left in a post-Chavez Latin America: what future?

12. The Asia-Pacific axis: between cooperation and conflict(s)

13. New (old) nationalisms: on the road to a re-definition of the international system

Recommended Bibliography

Art e Jervis, International Politics: Endurin Concepts and Contemporary Issues, NY: Pearson, 2012
Buzan, B. e Little, R., International Systems in World History, Oxford, OUP, 2000
Buzan, B., From International to World Society?, Cambridge: CUP, 2004
Watson, A., The Evolution of International Society, Londres: Routledge, 1992

Complementary Bibliography

Clark, I., Legitimacy in International Society, Oxford: OUP, 2005
Hurrell, A., On Global Order, Oxford: OUP, 2007
Little, R. e Williams, J., eds., The Anarchical Society in a Globalised World, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006
Navari, C., ed., Theorising International Society, NY: Palgrave MacMillan, 2009
Teschke, B., The Myth of 1648, Londres: Verso, 1992

Weekly Planning

Week 1
Presentation of the course and its topics

Week 2
The New World Order

Week 3
From the End of History to the Clash of Civilizations

Week 4
Nuclear power

Week 5
New actors and new threats

Week 6
From the Washington Consensus to the post-Washington Consensus

Week 7
PIGS, BRICs and other hierarchies

Week 8
Justice and law in times of globalization

Week 9
From just war to justified war?

Week 10
Humanitarianism and interventionism: dangerous liaisons?

Week 11
The Arab Springs

Week 12
The New Left in a post-Chavez Latin America: what future?

Week 13
The Asia-Pacific axis: between cooperation and conflict(s)

Week 14
New (old) nationalisms: on the road to a re-definition of the international system

Week 15
Revisions for the final exam

Demonstration of the syllabus coherence with the curricular unit's objectives

This syllabus intends to embody the formative goals above mentioned (1 to 3). Four main areas are identified, in which “heavy” trends of structuring of the international system are being revealed: the international economic order (5 and 6), peace and security (1 to 4), global justice (7 to 9) and regionalism (10 to 13). The concrete topics included in the syllabus are seen as crucial realities which synthesize the most important dynamics of reconfiguration of the international order and in which the different scales of core-periphery relations take place. The articulation of topics with a global nature and of others with a regional scope intends to call the attention of the students to the decisive importance of local changes (e.g. in the Arab World or Latin America) to the reshaping of the world order.

Demonstration of the teaching methodologies coherence with the curricular unit's objectives

In order to achieve objectives 1 to 3, classes will be simultaneously have the presentation of the course contents by the professor (using the expository method) and debates by the students, based on recommended bibliographical resources or other to be defined in the class.

relevant generic skillimproved?assessed?
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